Wednesday, July 27, 2011

What Do Books Mean To You?

Blogaholic Designs”=I can't remember a time in my life when reading wasn't important to me. My family are all readers, and it always surprises me when someone tells me that they don't read much. I even know one person who not only has never been to a library, but who admits they have never read a book all the way through. I was so shocked by this, I was speechless (and if you knew me, you'd know how rare this is!).

Reading for information is important, but in my life, reading is most often pure escapism. Traveling to other lands, through other peoples' lives, into other realities is a way to take a mini-vacation from my own challenges. It's easy to get lost in stories and forget about the day-to-day trials and tribulations of real life. As you go deeper and deeper into someone else's universe, suddenly the importance of your broken lawn mower, long hours at work, and too-crowded schedule begins to fade away. At least for a while. Minutes, even hours, can pass free from worry and stress.

So, I challenge you, blog readers, to pick up a book or turn on your ereader. Lose yourself in a book; it can be the best therapy - and it's certainly cheaper than a shrink!

6 comments:

Ann said...

Agree with you totally, cannot imagine life without books - pure escapism.

pauldail.com said...

As an English teacher, it shocks me as well to hear how many of my students don't like to read (fortunately, that number seems to be shrinking... something which gives me reassurance as a writer :)

I wish I had more time, but unfortunately, my reading time is restricted to just before bed, which definitely make for some interesting dreams depending on what I'm reading.

Paul D. Dail
www.pauldail.com

jmrinaldo said...

Thank you both for your comments. I'm very gratified, pauldail, to hear that the number of students who don't like to read is shrinking. I hope that trend continues. I don't think kids in their teens understand how rich their lives can be with the help of good books! I very much fear that technology has created an entire generation of people who require instant gratification - thus the effort and time they'd have to put into reading a book is more than they care to spend. I hope I'm wrong about that.

pauldail.com said...

I have to thank Harry Potter and Twilight for this phenomenon (although I've heard the latter isn't very well-written. It's pretty far down on my list of books to read, but I will eventually for the sake of my stepdaughter, who loved them). They have spurred a new generation of readers, for which I would also hope will combat the need for instant gratification. One step at a time, eh?

Paul D. Dail
www.pauldail.com

jmrinaldo said...

I agree, pauldail. The Harry Potter books have rejuvenated youthful (and adult) interest in reading (my wife has read them all and loves them). She had a hard time getting into the Twilight books - too high school, I think - not enough "fantasy". But we're both glad to see young people reading more.

Lorane said...

Joe,
First, I deserve a book just for a) finding this post; b) my review of "A Spy. . ." is better executed than others I've scanned and 3) I believe I expressed the same general posits re: what a book means in my blog. The one about you.
Just as men strive for perfection (C.G. Jung), women strive for completion. Reading is the ticket to the degree of comleteness one can garner in the short time before the life train leaves the station. Books, then, provide the vicarious life experiences that one either can't afford, lack the time to execute or, like your reader, hunger for associational inspiration that may yield fodder for my own writing. (There's really no such thing as altruism) In conclusion (whew!) I've already recommended your book to a friend - California super "people person" - who not only bought it but posted it on Facebook. Her friends/contacts/ influence make Sherman's march through Atlanta seem a mere tip-toe performance!
Later, Lorane. . . .